Penn Medicine’s TTM Academy Podcasts
Episode 17 - New evidence: physician perspectives on post-arrest neuroprognostication

Episode 17 - New evidence: physician perspectives on post-arrest neuroprognostication

February 14, 2020

Drs. Teran and Abella discuss a hot-off-the-press survey study by Maciel CB et al (Critical Care Medicine, 2020), probing physician perspectives and practice on post-arrest neurologic assessment and prognostication. Do all of us follow the international guidelines for this phase of care? What are points of confusion in current “real world” practice?  Join us to answer these questions and hear about key action items for all of us who manage post-arrest care.

Key reading:

  • Neuroprognostication Practices in Postcardiac Arrest Patients: An International Survey of Critical Care Providers. Maciel CB, Barden MM, Youn TS, Dhakar MB, Greer DM. Crit Care Med. 2020 Feb;48(2):e107-e114. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31939809
Episode 16 - Gender differences in cardiac arrest and post-arrest care

Episode 16 - Gender differences in cardiac arrest and post-arrest care

January 10, 2020

Drs. Abella and Teran discuss the scientific literature surrounding gender differences in care during and following cardiac arrest. From differences in bystander CPR provision for public cardiac arrests to post-arrest DNR status and cardiac catheterization; listen to hear more.

 

Key publications for this episode:

  1. Lindgren E et al. Gender differences in utilization of coronary angiography and angiographic findings after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A registry study. Resuscitation. 2019 Oct;143:189-195. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31330199
  2. Perman SM et al. Sex Differences in "Do Not Attempt Resuscitation" Orders After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and the Relationship to Critical Hospital Interventions. Clin Ther. 2019 Jun;41(6):1029-1037. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31047712
  3. Jeong JS et al. Gender disparities in percutaneous coronary intervention in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Am J Emerg Med. 2019 Apr;37(4):632-638. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30563798
  4. Blewer AL et al. Gender Disparities Among Adult Recipients of Bystander Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Public. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2018 Aug;11(8):e004710. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30354377
Episode 15 - ReSS Year in Review: Part 2 of 2

Episode 15 - ReSS Year in Review: Part 2 of 2

December 15, 2019

Drs. Robert Neumar and Cindy Hsu (both at University of Michigan) continue their discussion with Dr. Felipe Teran following the plenary “Year in Review” presentation by Dr. Neumar at the American Heart Association Resuscitation Science Symposium (ReSS) in Philadelphia. If you missed ReSS, this is your chance to hear summaries of the top studies that impacted cardiac arrest and post-arrest care in the past 12 months. Note that this is the second part of a two-part podcast: Check your earlier in this feed for Episode 14 contains the first half of this conversation.

Key readings for this podcast include:

  • Nordberg P et al. Effect of Trans-Nasal Evaporative Intra-arrest Cooling on Functional Neurologic Outcome in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The PRINCESS Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA2019 May 7;321(17):1677-1685. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31063573
  • Lascarrou JB et al. Targeted Temperature Management for Cardiac Arrest with Nonshockable Rhythm. N Engl J Med. 2019 Dec 12;381(24):2327-2337. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31577396
  • Scarpino et al. Neurophysiology and neuroimaging accurately predict poor neurological outcome within 24 hours after cardiac arrest: The ProNeCA prospective multicentre prognostication study. Resuscitation. 2019 Oct;143:115-123. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31400398
  • Moseby-Knappe M et al. Serum Neurofilament Light Chain for Prognosis of Outcome After Cardiac Arrest. JAMA Neurol. 2019 Jan 1;76(1):64-71. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30383090
  • Oddo M et al. Quantitative versus standard pupillary light reflex for early prognostication in comatose cardiac arrest patients: an international prospective multicenter double-blinded study. Intensive Care Med. 2018 Dec;44(12):2102-2111. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30478620
  • Vreselja Z et al. Restoration of brain circulation and cellular functions hours post-mortem. Nature. 2019 Apr;568(7752):336-343. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30996318
Episode 14 - ReSS Year in Review: Part 1 of 2

Episode 14 - ReSS Year in Review: Part 1 of 2

December 3, 2019

Resuscitation Science Top Studies of 2019: Part 1 of 2

Drs. Robert Neumar and Cindy Hsu (both at University of Michigan) are guest presenters in this special TTM Academy Podcast, hosted by Dr. Felipe Teran. They recap the plenary “Year in Review” presentation by Dr. Neumar at the American Heart Association Resuscitation Science Symposium (ReSS) in Philadelphia. If you missed ReSS, this is your chance to hear summaries of the top studies that impacted cardiac arrest and post-arrest care in the past 12 months. Note that this is a two-part podcast: Episode 15 will present the second alf of this discussion in two weeks.

Year in Review Slides

Key readings for this podcast include:

Episode 13 – Transesophageal echocardiography during cardiac arrest resuscitation

Episode 13 – Transesophageal echocardiography during cardiac arrest resuscitation

November 8, 2019

Drs. Teran and Abella discuss the role of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in the resuscitation of cardiac arrest patients.  Listen for details of how this cutting-edge application of TEE could play a role in improving arrest diagnostics, CPR quality and possibly arrest outcomes.

 

Key Reading:

  1. Teran F et al. “Evaluation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using transesophageal echocardiography in the emergency department.” Resuscitation. 2019 Apr;137:140-147. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30779977
  2. Catena E et al. “Association between left ventricular outflow tract opening and successful resuscitation after cardiac arrest.” Resuscitation. 2019 May;138:8-14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30825552
Episode 12 - HYPERION Results - TTM following non-shockable cardiac arrest

Episode 12 - HYPERION Results - TTM following non-shockable cardiac arrest

October 4, 2019

Earlier this week, results from the HYPERION trial were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Drs. Abella and Teran discuss the use of TTM for patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest with a non-shockable initial rhythm.

 

Suggested Readings:

  1. Lascarrou JB et at., “Targeted Temperature Management for Cardiac Arrest with Nonshockable Rhythm.” N Engl J Med. 2019 Oct 2.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31577396
  2. Perman SM et al., “The Utility of Therapeutic Hypothermia for Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome Patients With an Initial Nonshockable Rhythm.” Circulation. 2015 Dec 1;132(22):2146-51. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26572795
  3. Grossestreuer AV et al., “Magnitude of temperature elevation is associated with neurologic and survival outcomes in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients with postrewarming pyrexia.” J Crit Care. 2017 Apr;38:78-83. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27866109
  4. Neilsen N et al., “Targeted temperature management at 33°C versus 36°C after cardiac arrest.” N Engl J Med. 2013 Dec 5;369(23):2197-206.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24237006
Episode 11 - ECMO Implementation for Refractory Cardiac Arrest in the ED

Episode 11 - ECMO Implementation for Refractory Cardiac Arrest in the ED

September 20, 2019

Following the success of Episode 6, which discussed the scientific evidence for ECMO in cardiac arrest, we decided to take a deeper look at the implementation of ECMO in the ED. Drs. Felipe Teran and Joseph Tonna discuss the utilization of ECMO for refractory cardiac arrest, the expansion of hospital ECMO programs to the emergency department and implementation of an ECMO program for cardiac arrest. This episode was recorded on location in Salt Lake City, Utah.

 

Key Reading:

  1. Tonna JE et al., “Practice characteristics of Emergency Department extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) programs in the United States: The current state of the art of Emergency Department extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ED ECMO).” Resuscitation. 2016 Oct;107:38-46. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27523953
  2. Tonna JE et al., “Development and Implementation of a Comprehensive, Multidisciplinary Emergency Department Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Program.” Ann Emerg Med. 2017 Jul;70(1):32-40. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28139304
Episode 10 - TTM Following Opioid Overdose Cardiac Arrest

Episode 10 - TTM Following Opioid Overdose Cardiac Arrest

September 6, 2019

Drs. Teran and Abella discuss the role of TTM for patients following cardiac arrest caused by opioid overdose. Several recent observational studies are reviewed to understand the demographics of patients who suffer opioid-related cardiac arrest, their outcomes, and whether TTM may be beneficial during post-arrest for these patients.

 

Key readings:

  1. Salcido DD et al, “Regional incidence and outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest associated with overdose.” Resuscitation 2016; 99:13-19.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.11.010
  2. Katz AZ et al, “Outcomes of patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest in the setting of drug overdose.” Resuscitation 2015; 94:23-27.http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2015.06.015
  3. Khan S et al, “Impact of Targeted Temperature Management on ED Patients with Drug Overdose–Related Cardiac Arrest.”, Journal of Medical Toxicology 2019; 15:22–29. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13181-018-0686-0
Episode 9 - MRI Imaging for Post-Arrest Neurological Prognostication

Episode 9 - MRI Imaging for Post-Arrest Neurological Prognostication

August 23, 2019

Following resuscitation from cardiac arrest, accurate evaluation of neurological recovery can help guide patient care and family decisions. In this podcast, Drs. Teran and Abella discuss a recent investigation into the use of MRI imaging in prognostication following resuscitation from arrest.

 

Key reading for this podcast:

Wallin E et al, "Acute brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging in relation to neurological outcome after cardiac arrest."Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2018 May;62(5):635-647. doi: 10.1111/aas.13074. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29363101

Episode 8 – Oxygen Delivery After Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation 

Episode 8 – Oxygen Delivery After Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation 

August 9, 2019

Episode 8 – Oxygen Delivery After Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation

 

During cardiac arrest resuscitation, most patients are intubated and placed on 100% oxygen. In this podcast, Drs. Teran and Abella discuss recent investigations that suggest that too much oxygen may worsen post-arrest injury. Global resuscitation guidelines suggest down-titration of oxygen as tolerated to maintain adequate O2 saturation, but it’s not clear how well this is done- many patients are left on high oxygen “dose” for hours.

 

Key readings for this podcast:

  1. Robert BW et al, “Association Between Early Hyperoxia Exposure After Resuscitation From Cardiac Arrest and Neurological Disability: Prospective Multicenter Protocol-Directed Cohort Study.” Circulation. 2018 May 15;137(20):2114-2124. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29437118
  2. Kilgannon JH et al, “Association between arterial hyperoxia following resuscitation from cardiac arrest and in-hospital mortality.” JAMA. 2010 Jun 2;303(21):2165-71. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20516417